Skip to main content

The Elsasser hop is a French hop variety grown on very limited acreage in the Alsace region. Alsace is on the eastern border of France and borders both Germany and Switzerland and the upper Rhine River. Elsasser hops, and cousins, Precoce de Bourgogne and Tardif de Bourgogne are considered true Strisselspalt varieties.

Drunken Chicken, Beer Can Chicken, Beer Butt Chicken: there are many names for it. But only one mandatory ingredient: beer.

Canned beer has had a bad rap in the past: considered declasse for one thing. But beer in cans does have some redeeming features - and not just the fact you can cook beer can chicken with them. Sunlight, which can damage flavor, is not able to permeate the can, so the intended taste remains. As well, canning beer prevents excess air from being trapped inside, which can also affect taste.

These instructions work with ALL the extract beer making recipes on this site. That said, I can't verify if any other recipes have taken into account the following. I would suggest either asking, if possible, or running the recipe through a beer recipe program with the amount of water you will boil with.

Many beer drinkers don't realize that beer can be made from more than grains. In fact, the first Europeans that settled in the United States were known to use pumpkins, spruce and other plants to make their beer (just think root beer). They used them not only for flavor, but as major components of the beer.

From the stupid things you do when you drink beer department.

This future Darwin award candidate hasn't figured out that when you crash your car drunk, you should probably leave the brews in the car, or at least hide them.

From the WUSA9.com website in Maryland, this is the full story of a moron. It does make for a good news story though.

The dog days of August bring heat, mugginess, and lazy afternoons by the pool, and is the perfect time to celebrate craft beers with festivals taking place all over the U.S. and Canada.

Craft beers are becoming the new "wines", as different varieties with different palates are created, and beer and food pairings are expanding to beyond pizza and wings. The growing number of craft beer festivals reflects that change.

I should start calling this the “Green Bottle Review Session,” but here we are.

We’re going to review a Stella Artois that I happened to find without the case punctured—no holes in it, so there should be no light that has gotten to it. As you can see, it pours fairly nice, as you would expect; nice carbonation with the bubbles; head retention’s moderate—went away fairly quickly, but it does leave a little white tiny head on the top.

Today we're going to talk a little bit about flaws. Most of this will be pretty evident. I made the slides pretty verbose, but I'll go through them anyway. One thing I really want to stress is a flaw is a flaw until it's not really a flaw. Sometimes these are just general comments, sensory comments. What may be a flaw in one beer may not be in another. The lesson really to anybody in beer, including my class, make sure it's really a flaw. The only way to do that is to know your styles.

Today we're going to talk about mashing. Mashing's an important process. This happens in the brewhouse, as opposed to malting, and also the other agriculture, drying hops and all that, so this is actually, you have your malt now in the brewhouse, and what you want to do is convert that malt into something that the yeast can eat, basically sugar water.

This is a small primer about judging beer. It's an entry level practical guide. For the pdf, click below.

Aroma

When you smell a beer, just like smelling a wine, you are searching for the essence of the beverage. Do you smell malts, hops, nothing? Sometimes you may smell something and not really know what it is. Therefore, one of the main things you need to develop is relating an aroma to a property in the beer.

We use cookies on our website to support technical features that enhance your user experience.

We also use analytics & advertising services. To opt-out click for more information.